Housing of the future nets three top awards from the City

 

CATALYST HOUSING

(From left to right) Tim Carpenter, MD of Willmott Dixon Housing, Julia Moulder, director of development at Catalyst Housing, Alderman Fiona Woolf CBE, Sharif Said, new homes team co-ordinator at Catalyst Housing, Marcus Nelson, architect from MEPK.

A landmark development, which is the first in London to meet the highest standards in three key sustainability measures, has been awarded high honours in The Sustainable City Awards.

The Greenway in Staines Road, Hounslow, walked away with a quarter of the highly commended awards, for sustainable building, tackling climate change, & resource conservation, at the prestigious award ceremony last night (19/03/13).  Set up by the City of London Corporation, the awards represent the three pillars of sustainable development; the economy, society and the environment.

Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, praised The Greenway when it opened in December 2012 as a “fantastic project which combines the highest environmental standards with truly innovative design. With decent sized, energy efficient homes, The Greenway boasts precisely the qualities I want to see in housing developments right across the capital.”

The 18 properties, which were delivered in partnership with Willmott-Dixon, MEPK Architects and the London Borough of Hounslow, are ecologically aware ensuring The Greenway leads the field in providing housing to help its residents live environmentally-friendly yet cost effective lives.

Built-in features include a biomass pellet boiler with a 90% efficiency rating for underfloor heating. Using the Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) from the Department of Energy and Climate Change it is estimated the average gas and electricity bill for a mid-floor flat this could be just under £500.

Our rainwater harvesting collects water from the roof to feed the WCs. The conservation tank can hold 20,000 litres and should reduce water consumption to 80 litres per day compared to the national average of 150.

Photovoltaic cells convert light directly into electricity and all residents can monitor this and the heat in their homes in real time to help them plan their usage.

An orchard of mini fruit trees and allotment space to encourage residents to grow their own fruit and vegetables.

All applicants had to show they understood a commitment to green living with a questionnaire on green and sustainable living. This included sending drawings of how they would plan out and use their allotments, what sustainable practices they would adopt and how green their current living was.

Julia Moulder, Director of Development for Catalyst said: “With just 12 highly commended awards available this is a well deserved acknowledgement for all those who worked to deliver an exceptional development. For the next two years we’ll be monitoring the green technologies in action – and using that to help inform our future developments to ensure we are building homes to benefit new residents.”